In-Silico Drugmaker Highlights Rapid Rx Development at BIO Investor Forum

 BIO Investor Forum meeting October 21, 2015, Parc 55 Hilton Hotel, San Francisco. Cyclica is an emerging biotech firm that invented a therapeutic platform based on technologies. It’s called the Ligand Express (TM). The company is now in a license deal with Johnson & Johnson . They repurposed a pharmaceutical product made in the US. The DoD asked them to weed out 2000 drugs down to 53 and eventually they selected one, Zoloft. It turns out that this drug works against Ebola. The Army’s recent deployment of 3000 people to Africa to set up field hospitals, used Zoloft to treat Ebola patients.

Another example, Procter & Gamble has a drug compound that was causing skin irritation in some people that use their Olay skin cream products. It caused a rash. The company isolated three compounds that cause the issue and then eliminated the compound. 

The company’s vision is to 

  •  Cut drug development costs in half
  •  FDA to approve their drugs and 
  • Be the best tech platform for every doc to do personalized medicine solution in the future. 

The goal is to create an automated platform compared to other in-Silico players. Other in Silico firms look for chemogenic compounds, but this company does it all via Ligands. The company’s business model is mainly to work with big pharmaceutical and nutraceutical projects. 

The platform is like the eBay platform. For example on a project basis they might get $10,000 $20,000 in revenue with this model. The second thing they would do is have a license model in which they would receive $25,000 or more per project. 

Their current prospects include Procter & Gamble, the Department of Defense or other similar types of firms. The CEO’s name is Paul Angelico. He said that they will need $20 million in cash by 2019. They currently seek $9.5 million from VC investors.

Achillion vs. Actelion More Biotech M&A’s to Come

Last week’s announcement by Swiss drug maker, Roche Holding AG, that it was buying biotech firm InterMune, Inc. for $8.3 billlion sparked speculation by industry watchers about who would be the biotechs that might be involved in the next round of M&As. InterMune makes a drug, Esbriet (pirefnidone) that treats a lung condition, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Esbriet is approved in Canada and Europe. The drug has the potential to become a blockbuster seller. InterMune’s product would join Roche’s Pulmozyme and Xolair to build up its lung drug portfolio.

A number of names popped up such as Achillion Pharamaceuticals, Actelion, Puma Biotechnology, Intercept Pharmaceuticals, and others. Maybe people heard Achillian but were attracted to similar sounding Actelion.

  • Achillion Pharamaceuticals makes Phase II hepatitis C virus (:HCV) candidate, ACH-3102.
  • Puma Biotechnology is developing its Phase III breast cancer candidate neratinib, PB272.
  • Intercept Pharmaceuticals makes its phase II nonalcoholic steatohepatitis drug, obeticholic acid, OCA.
  • Actelion Pharmaceuticals makes a cancer drug to treat a rare form of non-Hodgekin’s lymphoma.

Some in the big pharma side are still holding out hopes of buying a biotech that can make their next blockbuster. So which will it be? Achillion? Actelion? Others? To be sure, we will need wait and see.

Acute Need for Early Warning Dx for “Silent Killer” Cancers

There is a need for early warning diagnostics to detect “silent killer” cancers such as pancreatic, liver, GI and lung cancers. Most of these cancers are discovered at the late stage when acute symptoms appear and no cure is possible.  Maybe an annual simple screening test could be developed that could accurately detect a molecular signature of these cancers.

It is a very sad situation indeed to see patients die just after two, four or six weeks post-diagnosis.  Just this past weekend, our co-writer and industry analyst for this blog and our market research firm succumbed to an aggressive cancer of unknown primary origin that spread to the liver.  She died in less than five weeks from diagnosis.  The FDG- PET CT scan showed active cancers in the liver, pancreas, uterus and breast. Ultimately the oncologist concluded that the cancer likely came from the pancreas. May she rest in peace.

Close relatives interested in getting a PET scan for themselves were advised that the Radiology Dept. would only offer a PET scan after a patient was already diagnosed to have cancer.  Whereas a PET scan is good at detecting cancer, it is a very expensive resource that hospitals choose to limit access to.

What is needed is an annual pre-symptomatic, accurate, low-cost multiple-molecular-marker, blood test that can screen for cancer at the earliest point – before a tumor is formed. The screening test would likely use a panel of biomarkers associated with the “silent cancers.”

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